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How To Make A Jukebox In Minecraft? A Complete Guide

As you may know, the Xbox 360 Edition of Minecraft does not support music discs. However, one can create a jukebox out of ordinary blocks to play music in his world – and I’ll tell you how it works!

Materials Required

Wood Planks:

Firstly, craft five wood planks and three wooden sticks together to make a jukebox. The recipe is as follows:

4x Wooden Planks+ 1 x Wooden Stick = 5 Wood Planks

3 x1Wooden Sticks = 3 Wood Sticks

Iron Ingots and Red-stone dust

Secondly, gather two iron ingots and six Red-stone dust. Then put them together in a vertical line with three blocks of space in the middle like this: The red circle marks the position of the jukebox that you’ll need to place after placing two glass blocks. Then, break the jukebox and replace it with two glass blocks like this:

The procedure of making a jukebox in Minecraft:

Now, one is ready for music! When you right-click on either block (the top or bottom one), it activates all four repeaters. The power will be directed through any Red-stone torches (including partnerships) and eventually reach all five-note blocks.

Each note block outputs a signal strength of 15 when it has no sound playing. This value decreases every second unless an adjacent powered note block is playing the same pitch, which increases by 1. This causes the note block to emit a sound with a constant slope.

The eight lines represent different materials that can be used for crafting jukeboxes. The red line represents wooden planks, the blue line represents nether brick blocks, the pink line represents sandstone, the brown line represents smooth stone, and the yellow one represents iron bars or glass panes. Note that you can run power through both sides of all but the bottom-center note block because it is adjacent to either air or transparent blocks on both sides.

How to make jukeboxes louder in Minecraft?

Complete Volume:

1 Total Audio: 0-2 (1 = 100%)

Block Volume: 1-2 (1 = 100%)

Total Audio: 2-8 (4 = 200%)

Minecraft has a minor bug where excessive audio volume does not play and returns only the lowest book possible. But if you set up your jukeboxes correctly, they’ll be very loud even without this volume boost.

Use these values on multiplayer servers:

You can even use these values on multiplayer servers (I tested with up to 82 players at once with no lag or crashes). You may need to tweak them depending on which version of Minecraft you’re using. Still, in general, these are good starting points for pretty much any jukebox in Minecraft, whether it is resource pack-based or vanilla (or hacked) versions.

Variables that affect the volume:

Some variables affect the final volume when using these values, such as the location of the jukebox and surrounding blocks. Still, you can easily experiment with these variables yourself. In addition to that, here’s a list of what not to do when making Minecraft jukeboxes:s

Don’t put lots of speakers all in one spot:

Don’t put lots of speakers all in one spot (e.g., five speakers next to each other, including one playing midi/records) – It doesn’t work well since it causes sound clipping and makes everything incredibly loud. I recommend putting them at least a few blocks away from each other if possible instead.

Read More:An Extensive Guide about Normal CPU Temperatures for Gaming and How It Affect the Performance?

Don’t use non-standard block types:

Don’t use non-standard block types for volume boosts (e.g., using stone slabs on top of regular stone blocks) – The standard stone block works best in most situations. Other blocks, such as torches, glass panes, chests, etc., also work well but may increase the sound volume less than just using regular stone blocks.

Don’t stack jukeboxes on top of each other:

Don’t stack jukeboxes on top of each other or put records inside another record jukebox – For some reason, you can only load one record at a time, even if it’s in its jukebox. If you want to play two documents at once (or however many), make sure they are both in their jukeboxes (not stacked).

Few notes:

  1. You’ll still need to use Red-stone wires or Red-stone comparators if your Minecraft version is before 1.11. Otherwise, the signal gets overpowered by block volume and does not activate the jukebox.
  2. The best way to test if they are loud is to put the jukeboxes in a quiet open space, put on some music, and stand near them with your finger lingering over the pause button of your Minecraft client so you can test it quickly. If you don’t hear anything or barely hear anything, then they need to be loaded more or moved further apart from each other.
  3. These values work for both standard records/midi files and custom ones created by using Note Blocks.

FAQs

  • How to make a jukebox in Minecraft?

A jukebox is a block that plays music discs. Place the jukebox down and right-click on it. You can then place music discs in the jukebox—Right-click it to open the GUI and right-click a slot to play that music.

  • How many discs does it hold?

The jukebox can hold up to 18 discs at a time, and the number of discs the jukebox holds corresponds to how many are required to play music.

  • How does it work?

Every time you put a music disc in the jukebox, it adds one to an internal number which determines how long the song will play. Once that reaches 18, you can no longer add music discs to the jukebox, and it will play for a longer time than if you did so.

  • How many do I need?

You need 12 discs to play music for an extended time. It doesn’t matter whether they are all one type or different types, as long as there are 12.

  • How do I get music discs?

You can craft them using an iron ingot and a record on the crafting table.

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