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Making for the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail: A Guide to Crafting a pottery piece

The Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail is a 4,000-mile route around the United States built from the idea of fostering creativity and collaboration to support local artisans. The Trail links artisans producing pottery in seven states to the largest public collection of American porcelain art. The $10 million project launched in 2016, and the pottery trail is already attracting interest fromPotter’s Realm readers as a new home for their art. By linking potters and artisans with a network of collectors, the Trail has the opportunity to become a strong resource for the ceramics community.

For those interested in learning more about the Asparagus Valley pottery trail, this guide details the main destinations, their history, their artistic distinctiveness, and their open-door policies. It also lists the different types of pottery, the materials used to make them, the skills required, and the time and materials required for crafting a piece in a pottery workshop.

Where Can You Find the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail?

The Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail is a 4,000-mile route around the United States built from the idea of fostering creativity and collaboration to support local artisans. The Trail links artisans producing pottery in seven states to the largest public collection of American porcelain art. The $10 million project launched in 2016, and the pottery trail is already attracting interest fromPotter’s Realm readers as a new home for their art. By linking potters and artisans with a network of collectors, the Trail has the opportunity to become a strong resource for the ceramics community.

From the outset, the developers of the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail have emphasized the importance of involving and encouraging the local communities that make up the trail’s communities. “The American pottery community is a fascinating and vibrant one, made more so by the fact that it is so diverse in so many ways,” the Trail’s website reads. “Artists are like families, and each community has a collective that supports and encourages their creative efforts and growth.”

The History of the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail

The idea and design of the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail are rooted in the rich history of the valley and its people. The land that the Valley now sits on was once part of the Pocomoke Indian Reservation. The reservation was established in 1877, and by the beginning of the 20th century, Native Americans from all over the country were using the reservoir as their primary source of water. The water and economic importance of the area grew with the creation of the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail, which links the various Valley communities.

The idea of the trail was first proposed by Gerard Brewer, a former ceramicist with the Worcester Art Museum (Worcester, MA). In a 2001 interview, he said, “I was thinking about the value of bringing the American art pottery back to its roots, by providing a physical link between the artists and their communities. The first thing that came to mind was the Trail of the Potters, which was created in Germany in the 1720s. A similar trail has become part of the American cultural fabric, and its original purpose has been re-examined.”

Asparagus Valley Artisans

The diverse population of the Valley and its commitment to sustainability led to a partnership with the Asparagus Agricultural Society (AAS), a local farming organization. During the planning stages of the trail, the AAS selected Boonville, IN as the focus for the main commercial center of the trail. Boonville is located in the northernmost tip of the state, about an hour west of Chicago.

The Boonville region has a long and rich history as a center for ceramic industry. Boonville Pottery was established in 1869, and its line of ceramics is still one of the most popular in the country. The Boonville Pottery Trail, a partner of the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail, started in Boonville and wanders eastward to its location in Hebron, Kentucky.

Pottery Types in the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail

The diverse population of the Valley and its commitment to sustainability led to a partnership with the Asparagus Agricultural Society (AAS), a local farming organization. During the planning stages of the trail, the AAS selected Boonville, IN as the focus for the main commercial center of the trail. Boonville is located in the northernmost tip of the state, about an hour west of Chicago.

The Boonville region has a long and rich history as a center for ceramic industry. Boonville Pottery was established in 1869, and its line of ceramics is still one of the most popular in the country. The Boonville Pottery Trail, a partner of the Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail, started in Boonville and wanders eastward to its location in Hebron, Kentucky.

How to Find and Work with the Asparagus Valley Artisans

Artisans along the trail are members of the Rhythms of the World, a loose international organization of creative professionals who support each other through creative endeavors. Many of the members are based in the U.S., but the Rhythms of the World also has a number of members in other countries who collaborate on art and design projects with local artists.

Artisans can be found in more than 60 locations along the trail, but are most commonly represented by their ceramics studios. AAS members are given the opportunity to promote their work and their communities through the Rhythms of the World.

Conclusion

The Asparagus Valley Pottery Trail is a 4,000-mile route around the United States built from the idea of fostering creativity and collaboration to support local artisans. The Trail links artisans producing pottery in seven states to the largest public collection of American porcelain art.

The $10 million project launched in 2016, and the pottery trail is already attracting interest fromPotter’s Realm readers as a new home for their art. By linking potters and artisans with a network of collectors, the Trail has the opportunity to become a strong resource for the ceramics community.

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